Top of Mind

What we're thinking about right now.
kate

Here at Realtime Project HQ, we’ve barely paused for breath in the past few weeks, and it’s going to continue this way right up until the holidays. We’ve attended SIME Helsinki, where Steven was a keynote speaker. Angela networked her way out of business cards at the ReadWriteWeb gathering in California two weeks ago and again at last week’s fantastic SIME conference in Stockholm (where we also pontificated and panelled). Then, we attended yesterday’s #140Conf in London where it was interesting to see the likes of Kodak, and Unilever amongst the twitterati.

Still on tap are Le Web, Europe’s biggest tech confab, on Dec 9 and 1O, and TechCrunch’s Realtime London get-together on Dec. 15 .
It sounds exhausting but in reality it’s an extremely exciting time for all of us at The Realtime Project. We’ve been conferencing so much because the topic du jour at every single one of these events is what we’re all about: realtime in its many forms. The days where businesses considered it “advanced” if they used email or instant messaging are over. Customers are increasingly demanding information in realtime, whilst companies that have yet to employ realtime internal business functions are losing out.
Mainstream media is increasingly catching on, and from BusinessWeek to the New York Times there’s a growing recognition that Realtime, Newnet, Web 3.0, the semantic web—whatever you want to call it—has is the next big thing, and companies need to reassess how they do business in this altered Web landscape.
Most businesses have the mobile toolkits at their disposal to make the most of the realtime world. And they’re increasingly keen to make the most of it—especially if it gives them an edge over competition. They just need to know how. Reps from the world of sports, to automotive to fashion, firms are catching on—and increasingly are outnumbering the Google’s and Microsoft’s of this world at these erstwhile tech-only conferences and events. Together, their presence and enthusiasm demonstrate a that the possibilities of realtime are endless—and that the best is yet to come. And that, in our view, can only be a good thing.

Now as we type we’re polishing the wine glasses for our very own Realtime meet-up tonight at Hub Culture Pavilion. Still on tap are Le Web, Europe’s biggest tech confab, on Dec 9 and 1O, and TechCrunch’s Realtime London get-together on Dec. 15. It sounds exhausting, but in reality it’s an extremely exciting time for all of us at The Realtime Project. We’ve been conferencing so much because the topic du jour at every single one of these events is what we’re all about: realtime in its many forms. The days when businesses considered it “advanced” if they used email or instant messaging are over. Customers are increasingly demanding information and interaction in realtime. Companies that have yet to re-engineer their internal business functions will lose out, plain and simple.

Mainstream media is increasingly catching on, and from BusinessWeek to the New York Times there’s a growing recognition that Realtime, Newnet, Web 3.0, the semantic web—whatever you want to call it—is the next big thing, and companies need to reassess how they do business in this altered Web landscape.

Most businesses have the toolkits at their disposal to make the most of realtime. And they’re increasingly keen to use them—especially if it gives them an edge over competition. They just need to know how. From the world of sports, automotive fashion, firms are catching on—and their reps increasingly are outnumbering the Google’s and Microsoft’s of this world at these erstwhile tech-only conferences and events. Together, their presence and their focus on realtime as a major driver of business innovation and value creation validate our position that the possibilities are wide open. And that, in our view, can only be a good thing.

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